About Us

Fellows Research Alliance is a clinical trials management and consulting group dedicated to research and development in an effort to bring new and safer products to patients. Our staff consists of highly trained physicians and clinical research professionals with over 50 years of clinical research experience. Fellows Research Alliance is currently serving the Georgia and South Carolina Coastal Empire. Our clinical research team has an extensive and diverse background that is beneficial to the patient, the medical community and the pharmaceutical industry.

With a diverse team of physician investigators, Fellows Research Alliance has the capability to conduct many trials within different indications. Our physician investigators have clinical experience in internal medicine, women’s health, pediatrics, GI health, respiratory, infectious diseases, endocrinology, as well as many others.

Fellows Research Alliance is proud of the close working relationship with its physicians, patients and pharmaceutical sponsors, and the integrity of our staff. Since March, 2008, all of our principal investigators are Certified Physician Investigators through the ACRP/APPI. We are committed to providing outstanding patient care within the context of research and quality research data.

In October, 2012, Fellows Research Alliance has partnered with Southcoast Medical Group to conduct clinical trials.  This partnership will allow both companies to conduct a more diverse range of clinical trials in the Coastal Empire area.

Meet the Staff

Dwan Fellows

Dwan Fellows

President/CEO

Monique Ooley

Monique Ooley

Clinical Director

Debra Walland, MD, FACOG, CPI

Debra Walland, MD, FACOG, CPI

Medical Director

Chris Fellows

Chris Fellows

CFO

Facebook Posts

Growing Concern Over Ingredients In Feminine Hygiene Products Prompts Legislation

In “Inspired Life,” the Washington Post (6/20, Chandler) reports there is growing concern about the ingredients used to make feminine care products and some bills have been introduced to address those concerns.

For example, “Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY) has introduced the Menstrual Products Right to Know Act, which would require companies to provide a detailed list of ingredients on menstrual products,” and Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) introduced a bill that “would direct the National Institutes of Health to conduct research to determine whether chemicals used in feminine hygiene products present health risks, including links to cancer or infertility.”

The Post adds the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists “recommends against using douches, because they are considered medically unnecessary and could increase the chance of bacterial infections or other problems.”
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The Dapa-CKD study to find better treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease. In Dapa-CKD, we are testing the potential role of dapagliflozin Farxiga) as a completely new type of treatment to reduce mortality and morbidity in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with CKD and increased albuminuria, (protein in the urine) a condition where there is still considerable unmet clinical need.

Farxiga is already approved for people with diabetes, but it may also help people with chronic kidney disease without diabetes.

We need participants with chronic kidney disease, with or withou diabetes) for this important study. The medication is taken every day, and visits to the site clinic are every 3 months. There is no charge, and reimbursement is available for time and travel. Please contact us at 912-355-4447 or info at fellowsreserach.com for more information.
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Know your rights as a volunteer.
There is a Participant Bill of Rights which outlines the universal rights of all study volunteers, including:
• Being told what will happen in the study and whether any procedures, drugs or devices are different than those that are used as standard medical treatment.
• Asking any questions about the trial before giving consent and at any time during the course of the study.
• Refusing to participate, for any reason, before and after the trial has started.

For more info and the entire Bill of Rights, go to CISCRP's online education center:
www.ciscrp.org/education-center/
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Yoga May Provide Relief From Menstrual Cramps And PMS, Review Study Suggests.
TIME (5/2, MacMillan) reports “yoga may provide relief from” menstrual cramps, PMS, and other conditions, “according to a new review of studies published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.” Researchers reviewed “15 studies that looked at how a regular yoga practice affects a woman’s experience of cramps, PMS, polycystic ovary syndrome (which can cause missed or infrequent periods) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder,” and “found that yoga was linked to reduced severity of symptoms and pain relief in women suffering from these conditions.”
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If you have been told that you should be on medication for high cholesterol but you just can't take the "statin" medications, we have a study for an investigational cholesterol medication being developed to avoid the usual side effects. Call us at (912) 355-4447 for more info. ... See MoreSee Less

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It is still not too late to get a flu shot. In the SE part of the country 8 out of 8 jurisdictions are reporting widespread or regional activity. Sadly, there have been 12 pediatric deaths. ... See MoreSee Less

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Leading the News
Widespread Shortage Of Ob-Gyns Found Throughout The US.
Scientific American (2/15, Maron) reports that there appears to be a widespread shortage of ob-gyns in rural America. For example, in 1980, “45 of Alabama’s 54 rural counties had hospitals providing obstetrical services. Today only 16 of them offer such care, and doctors say that means many women need to drive an hour or more to deliver their babies or even get basic prenatal care from an ob-gyn.” The article adds, “such extreme access problems lead to difficult decisions” on whether or not to get care. The issue with disappearing maternal care is common nationwide. Only “about 6 percent of the nation’s ob-gyns work in rural areas, according to the latest survey numbers from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).”
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Medscape (1/30, Nelson) reports that “exercise does not appear to have any effect on the development of lymphedema in breast cancer patients.” Investigators found that lymphedema rates were nearly the “same for women randomly allocated to receive education only and for women allocated to receive education plus personalized exercise instruction from a physical therapist.” The research was presented at the Cancer Survivorship Symposium Advancing Care and Research. ... See MoreSee Less

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Heavy Periods / Uterine Fibroids
We are currently recruiting participants for this important study is designed to evaluate a new investigational medication for the treatment of heavy periods in women with suspected or known uterine fibroids to see if it decreases heavy periods and reduces the size of uterine fibroids. In order to qualify to participate in this trial you must be:
•Females between the ages of 18-50
•Having monthly periods that are heavy bleeding

Participants will receive a study-related medical examination with laboratory services similar to an annual exam at your GYN (Pap smear, ultrasound, etc) and all study medication at no cost. This clinical trial is being offered at our Savannah, GA office only. Compensation for time and travel will be provided.
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fellowsresearch.com updated their cover photo. ... See MoreSee Less

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Use Of Mammography Increased Among Older Americans Under ACA, Study Indicates.
On its website, CNN (1/9, Scutti) reports that the Affordable Care Act eliminated many out-of-pocket costs for preventive healthcare services such as mammography and colonoscopy, tests used to detect cancer. According to a new study published in Cancer, the use of mammography increased among older Americans thanks to the ACA, yet no similar gains in the use of colonoscopy were found. Dr. Gregory Cooper, lead author of the study and program director of gastroenterology at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, explained that the study was undertaken because researchers “wanted to see, as a natural experiment, what happens when you change the financial burden on preventive services.”
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Women Face Nearly 20% Higher Costs To Cover Medical Bills In Retirement, Report Suggests.
The Wall Street Journal (12/7, Tergesen, Subscription Publication) reports a survey released Wednesday by HealthView Services found that women face nearly 20% higher costs to cover medical bills in retirement. The Journal says longevity is a key factor, since women, on average, live about two years longer than men.
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