About Us

Fellows Research Alliance is a clinical trials management and consulting group dedicated to research and development in an effort to bring new and safer products to patients. Our staff consists of highly trained physicians and clinical research professionals with over 50 years of clinical research experience. Fellows Research Alliance is currently serving the Georgia and South Carolina Coastal Empire. Our clinical research team has an extensive and diverse background that is beneficial to the patient, the medical community and the pharmaceutical industry.

With a diverse team of physician investigators, Fellows Research Alliance has the capability to conduct many trials within different indications. Our physician investigators have clinical experience in internal medicine, women’s health, pediatrics, GI health, respiratory, infectious diseases, endocrinology, as well as many others.

Fellows Research Alliance is proud of the close working relationship with its physicians, patients and pharmaceutical sponsors, and the integrity of our staff. Since March, 2008, all of our principal investigators are Certified Physician Investigators through the ACRP/APPI. We are committed to providing outstanding patient care within the context of research and quality research data.

In October, 2012, Fellows Research Alliance has partnered with Southcoast Medical Group to conduct clinical trials.  This partnership will allow both companies to conduct a more diverse range of clinical trials in the Coastal Empire area.

Meet the Staff

Dwan Fellows

Dwan Fellows

President/CEO

Monique Ooley

Monique Ooley

Lead CCRC

Debra Walland, MD, FACOG, CPI

Debra Walland, MD, FACOG, CPI

Medical Director

Chris Fellows

Chris Fellows

CFO

Facebook Posts

Study: Clinical trials indicate positive results for Zika vaccine

Phase 1 human clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of an Army-developed Zika purified inactivated virus (ZPIV) vaccine have shown it to be safe and well tolerated, according to a recent study.
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Smartphone App-Guided Acupressure May Provide More Relief From Menstrual Cramp Pain Than Typical Medical Treatments, Research Suggests.

Reuters (12/8, Rapaport) reported, “Women with intense menstrual cramp pain may get more relief from smartphone app-guided acupressure than with typical medical treatments,” such as analgesics, researchers reported after randomizing “221 women to use the app or to stick with usual care for six months.” By the study’s end, “women who used the acupressure app reported significantly less menstrual pain than women who didn’t, the study found.” The findings were published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
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New Guidelines Lower Definition Of High Blood Pressure!

In “To Your Health,” the Washington Post (11/13, Bernstein, Cha) reports, “Acting for the first time in 14 years, the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology and nine other groups redefined high blood pressure as a reading of 130 over 80, down from 140 over 90.” This “change means that 46 percent of US adults, many of them under the age of 45, now will be considered hypertensive.” The Post points out that “under the previous guideline, 32 percent of US adults had” hypertension.
On its front page, the New York Times (11/14, A1, Kolata, Subscription Publication) reports that “under the guidelines...the number of men under age 45 with a diagnosis of high blood pressure will triple, and the prevalence among women under age 45 will double.”
Bloomberg News (11/13, Cortez) reports that the update “is based on a three-year review of almost 1,000 studies.” Bloomberg News adds, “A healthier diet and more exercise, unsurprisingly, are the primary recommendations for those who fall into the new category of stage 1 hypertension, previously called ‘pre-hypertension’ or ‘high-normal blood pressure,’ said Paul Whelton, chair of global public health at the Tulane University School of Public Health and lead author of the guidelines.”
USA Today (11/13, Painter) reports that “the guidelines, presented at a heart association meeting and published in...the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, also spell out exactly how health care providers and people at home should check blood pressure.” For instance, physicians “and nurses are urged to let patients rest five minutes first and then to average at least two readings over two visits.” Meanwhile, “patients are urged to take regular readings at home, with a device checked out by their health care providers.”
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ACOG Opposes FDA Guidance Against Removal Of Uterine Fibroids With Ultrasonic Aspirators

Medscape (10/31, Lowes) reports “companies that make ultrasonic surgical aspirators should label them as contraindicated for removing uterine fibroids because they could inadvertently disseminate occult cancer, the US Food and Drug Administration said” in new nonbinding guidance reprising warnings about power morcellators. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists opposes the new FDA recommendation, and has said the contraindication for using ultrasonic aspirators to remove fibroids was “too rigid and eliminates patient choice.” ACOG “agreed that the device can disseminate occult cancer but disagreed with the FDA’s claim that there are safer alternatives, noting that abdominal hysterectomies come with greater health risks.”
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Vaginal Estrogen Use Safe Among Postmenopausal Women, Research Suggests. 🔬😀

MedPage Today (10/13, Monaco) reported that in a study presented at the annual meeting of the North American Menopause Society, “vaginal estrogen use was found to be safe among postmenopausal women.” Investigators “found vaginal estrogen use was not associated with any increased risk for a global index event.” MedPage Today added that the “findings were similar among users with an intact uterus (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.77) or who have undergone a hysterectomy (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.63-1.08) after adjustment for age, education, prior estrogen use, and a history of cancer, CVD, or DVP/PE.”
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Women Who Take Folic Acid Supplements During Pregnancy May Be Less Likely To Have Children With Autism, Study Suggests.

Reuters (9/18, Cohen) reports women who took folic acid supplements during their pregnancies were less likely to have children with autism even when the mothers were exposed to pesticides that have been linked to the disorder, according to a 510-child study published in Environmental Health Perspectives. The study suggests that “folic acid might reduce, though not eliminate, an increased risk of autism associated with maternal pesticide exposure.” The article notes that the US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women who may become pregnant take daily folic acid supplements.
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Over Fifty Percent Of Rural Counties Lack A Hospital Where Women Can Deliver Babies, Study Suggests.

The Washington Post (9/5, Johnson) reports in its “Wonkblog” that 54 percent of rural communities “lacked a hospital with obstetrics services” in 2014, according to a new study published in the journal Health Affairs. As a result, “2.4 million women of child-bearing age” reside “in counties without hospitals that deliver babies,” the Post says. The article states that Tufts Medical Center obstetrician and gynecologist Megan Evans “has been working with the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists” to address the problem, adding that the federal National Health Service Corps will reimburse medical students for their schooling “as long as they commit to practicing in an underserved community for a given period of time.” However, presently communities are not defined by their specific care shortages, and many young physicians are unwilling “to relocate to remote rural areas where they may feel isolated.”

ProPublica (9/5, Gallardo, Martin) reports that researcher Katy B. Kozhimannil said Medicaid is an “incredibly important... factor in hospitals’ decisions around whether to keep obstetric services.” She and her team found that “rural counties in states with more generous Medicaid programs...were less likely to lose hospital-based obstetric services.”
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Women With High Cholesterol Tend To Have Lower Rates Of Breast Cancer Than Women With Lower Levels, Research Suggests.

TIME (8/31, MacMillan) reports that research suggests “women with high cholesterol tend to have lower rates of breast cancer than those with lower levels...and those who do get breast cancer are less likely to die from their disease.” The study was presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.
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If you are bothered by heavy menstrual bleeding, or severe cramping, you may qualify for one of several studies we are conducting for women with fibroids.
You do not have to have fibroids already diagnosed, but if you think you may have them, contact us. Part of the screening procedure includes an ultrasound to evaluate whether there are fibroids present.
As always, with our studies, there is no charge to you and no insurance is required. Call for a screening appointment in Savannah at (912) 355 -4447 or Bluffton,SC at (843) 837-5590
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Thank you to the participants of the completed Fibromyalgia study. The data showed that the investigational medication did not show to be more effective than Lyrica, unfortunately. However, data from the study is useful to the future study by the sponsor who is still dedicated to work to help patients with this often misunderstood disease. We were able to advance medical knowledge with the study, for that, we are grateful to our wonderful participants. ... See MoreSee Less

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Thank you to the participants of the completed fibromyalgia study. As a follow up, I have to report that the investigational medication did not show to be any more efficacious than Lyrica. The sponsor is still dedicated to working to improve the lives of the patients with fibromyalgia. The study itself did give them excellent data about this often misunderstood disease. We did advance medical knowledge, so thank you for that. ... See MoreSee Less

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People who are in a clinical trial or are thinking about joining a clinical trial have the right to ask the study staff any questions they may have about the study.

The questions below are useful for patients, potential study volunteers, and their family members or friends, to ask the research staff - which can include doctors, nurses, study coordinators and other people who help conduct the trial.


What is the main purpose of the study?

Does the study include a placebo or a medication already on the market?

If the treatment works, can I still use it after the study?

What are the credentials and experience of the doctors and their staff regarding clinical research?

What happens if I want to stop the study before it ends?

At Fellows Research, we are happy to answer all questions that you have long before you decide to participate in a trial.
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